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Your college student should know how to deal with campus police

Heading off to college is a time of growth and excitement, but it can also be a time when many young people make mistakes. As your son or daughter prepares to move on campus or live at school, it's important that he or she know how to properly deal with campus police. Knowing what to do in case of questioning or a problem can help them protect their own rights and interests.

Campus police are there to protect and support students who live on campus, but there may be limits to their authority. When a student is facing accusations of wrongdoing or even facing criminal charges, he or she will find it beneficial to work with a South Carolina legal professional who understands the limits of campus police and how to protect student rights. When a college student is in trouble, his or her education, future opportunities and personal freedoms could be at stake.

Questions about campus police

There are a few questions that can help you understand the role of campus police and what to do when under questioning. Most schools have strict rules regarding student behavior and moral codes, and even a minor problem could result in a suspension or even expulsion. The following are common questions people have about campus police:

  • Are they real police? In some cases, campus police are local police contracted to work with the college or university. Other times, they are essentially security guards. They may not have the authority to detain and question, but they may be able to conduct certain types of searches.
  • Should you talk to them? Regardless of whether campus police are real officers of the law, you have the right to remain silent. You can also ask for legal support. Some schools may bring penalties against students who are uncooperative.
  • Is your dorm room private? You have right to a reasonable expectation of privacy while living on campus. However, most schools do retain the right to search dorm rooms if there is suspected drug use or other allegations against a student.

One of the most important things a college student can do when in legal trouble is to ask for an attorney. There is a lot on the line for a young person facing criminal allegations or serious administrative penalties. With the right legal support, it may be possible to fight back, keep the student's criminal record clean and mitigate penalties.

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Over my career, I have earned a number of honors reflecting my professionalism and commitment to my clients. These awards include:

    • 10 best 2016 client satisfaction American institute of personal injury attorneys
    • 10 best 2016 client satisfaction American institute of criminal law attorneys
    • Martindale-Hubbell | Distinguished | Peer Rated for High Professional Achievement | 2019
    • National Academy of Criminal Defense Attorneys
    • The National Trial Lawyers | Top 100 Trial Lawyers
    • The National Trial Lawyers | Top 40 Under 40
    • Nationally Ranked Superior DUI Attorney By the nafdd | 2013
    • Top Young Attorneys | 2014 | Rising Stars selected by Peer Recognition and Professional Achievement
    • Rated By Super Lawyers | Rising Stars | Ryan L. Beasley | SuperLawyers.com
    • America's Most Honored Professionals | Ryan L. Beasley
    • Martindale-Hubbell | Client Champion | Gold / 2019
    • Expertise | Best Criminal Defense Lawyers in Greenville
    • 2015 Legal Elite of the Upstate | Greenville's Top Attorneys
    • Legal Elite of the Upstate
    • Legal Elite of the Upstate 2013-2018
    • Client Distinction Award | Ryan L. Beasley, Esq.
    • Client Champion 2019 | Ryan L. Beasley | Gold
    • Highest Possible Rating in Both Legal Ability & Ethical Standards | Ryan L. Beasley, Esq.
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