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Greenville Criminal Law Blog

What should you know if charged with tax evasion?

If you are facing charges of tax evasion, you may be tempted to underestimate the serious nature of this type of criminal offense. White collar crimes, which are offenses that often involve financially motivated criminal activity, can result in penalties that can change the course of your life. It is in your interests to take these charges seriously and start fighting for your future.

Most white collar crimes, such as tax evasion, involve the theft of information or money. They can seem like victimless crimes since they lack an element of violence, but the government takes these cases very seriously. Failing to pay your taxes could land you behind bars, and it is in your interests to know what you're up against and how you can prepare an effective, thoughtful defense strategy.

Understanding the options of plea bargaining

If you are facing criminal charges, especially in federal court, you may have great concern about how your case will turn out. This may be particularly true if the prosecution seems to have significant evidence against you. In fact, the prosecution team may seem rather confident that they will get a conviction once the judge and jury hear the facts of the case.

Whether you are facing white collar crimes, drug charges or other felony offenses, you may understand that a conviction can mean serious, life-changing consequences. If you are facing multiple charges, it is possible you may be looking at decades behind bars. In situations like these, the prosecutor may approach you with a deal.

Binge drinking is a serious problem

Binge drinking is a pattern of drinking alcohol designed to get you drunk and your blood alcohol content above the legal limit. Binge drinking is a common, excessive and potentially deadly act in the United States.

The last study conducted by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) in 2015, found that those ages 18-24 and 25-34 binge drank the most at 25% and 27% respectively. The third-place winner may be an age group that surprises you; 20% of 35-44-year old’s reported binge drinking.

You do not feel impaired. Could you still face DUI charges?

No one wants to end up pulled over by a police officer after having a fun night out. Of course, officers have a job to do, and you could be the one who ends up in their line of sight for whatever initial reason. If an officer stops your vehicle and suspects that you are operating that vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol, you could face a serious predicament.

You may want to argue that you do not feel impaired or that you do not believe that the officer's suspicions are correct, but it may be in your best interests to exercise your right to remain silent. Though remaining respectful and answering necessary questions is wise, you may want to gain information on your situation before speaking too freely with an officer.

Reasonable defense options when fighting a DUI in South Carolina

Perhaps you were out with friends or headed home from a nice dinner when you noticed flashing lights behind you. When an officer pulls you over for suspected drunk driving, it can be frightening, but it can be especially overwhelming to find yourself facing DUI charges. Whether it is your first offense or you have other DUIs on your record, you understand how important it is to fight back. 

Many people underestimate the serious nature of a DUI offense -- you should not be one of them. It is in your interests to take your case seriously, mounting a defense that confronts the prosecution's case effectively. There are several different options for reasonable DUI defense strategies, and the right one for your case depends on the circumstances of your individual situation. 

How law enforcement agencies target drivers on I-85

The number of stories is almost staggering. Search for “drug charges I-85” online and you’ll get page after page of results from recent years. There are many stories and press releases about officers arresting individuals for drugs after traffic stops on Interstate 85. It’s not an accident.

As a story by the Greenville News makes clear, law enforcement officers make a concerted effort to monitor the busy highway as part of an effort known as Operation Rolling Thunder. And these agencies are going to great lengths to find a reason to look in an individual’s vehicle. As one deputy explained to the reporter, “Nearly everyone does something illegal if you follow them long enough.”

College students aren't always presumed innocent

College is often a young adult's first time out from under their parents' roof for an extended period of time. While moving into the dorms is a great learning experience, it can also be hard on both the students and their parents, as mistakes are made that may have long-ranging consequences. 

College students are expected to abide by the rules and their school's code of conduct. While the codes vary from school to school, generally speaking, facing criminal charges may be a cause for suspension or expulsion — often without due legal process for the student. Conduct that is not criminal or that would not be illegal off-campus can also result in harsh disciplinary measures. 

South Carolina college has its own municipal court

As you walk on the campus of Clemson University, you may think the laws and rules of surrounding Clemson, South Carolina, apply. However, this may not be the case.

Clemson University has the unique position of being its own municipality. The municipality of Clemson University includes a five-mile radius around the center of the campus. This separates the college from the town of Clemson. Where you are located between Clemson and Clemson University could affect which laws apply.

Theft, embezzlement and fraud: What's the difference?

Theft, fraud and embezzlement are all serious criminal charges. And one is not necessarily worse than the other. The penalties vary with the severity of the crime – the circumstances and the amount of money involved.

Here’s a closer look at these terms you often hear in the news and what they may mean in a legal context.

Professionals facing criminal charges may have twice the worries

Professionals licensed in their field have twice as much to worry about when facing a criminal charge. On top of defending their rights against criminal allegations, they must protect their professional license.

Most professional fields take a criminal conviction very seriously, as their freedom and their livelihood are at risk if convicted. It is important to be proactive in defense of both.

Over my career, I have earned a number of honors reflecting my
professionalism and commitment to my clients. These awards include:

    • 10 best 2016 client satisfaction American institute of personal injury attorneys
    • 10 best 2016 client satisfaction American institute of criminal law attorneys
    • Martindale-Hubbell | Distinguished | Peer Rated for High Professional Achievement | 2019
    • National Academy of Criminal Defense Attorneys
    • The National Trial Lawyers | Top 100 Trial Lawyers
    • The National Trial Lawyers | Top 40 Under 40
    • Nationally Ranked Superior DUI Attorney By the nafdd | 2013
    • Top Young Attorneys | 2014 | Rising Stars selected by Peer Recognition and Professional Achievement
    • Rated By Super Lawyers | Rising Stars | Ryan L. Beasley | SuperLawyers.com
    • America's Most Honored Professionals | Ryan L. Beasley
    • Martindale-Hubbell | Client Champion | Gold / 2019
    • Expertise | Best Criminal Defense Lawyers in Greenville
    • 2015 Legal Elite of the Upstate | Greenville's Top Attorneys
    • Legal Elite of the Upstate
    • Legal Elite of the Upstate 2013-2018
    • Client Distinction Award | Ryan L. Beasley, Esq.
    • Client Champion 2019 | Ryan L. Beasley | Gold
    • Highest Possible Rating in Both Legal Ability & Ethical Standards | Ryan L. Beasley, Esq.
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